At Testlio, we are looking at various performance indicators for every tester. We are constantly looking at qualities and skills such as: 

  • Bug Report Quality - Following all the bug report standards, having all necessary attachments, using correct written English. 
  • Reliability - This shows how reliable a tester is and is calculated based on how many test cycles or tasks you have accepted, and in how many test cycles or task lists you have actually participated. If you have accepted a test cycle and never showed up, this can be considered as unreliable. 
  • Timeliness - This shows how well you time your task lists and is calculated based on time you submit your tasks in comparison to the due date. Testers who are often late may be receiving less projects unless negotiated with Test Leads and QA managers for specific reasons why tasks have been submitted late.  
  • Content Quality - This is how well you structure your steps to reproduce and expected and actual results. A lot is to do with how well the sentences are structured grammatically and how easy it is for others to reproduce or follow. 
  • Approval Rate - Shows percentage of all issues that you submit that have been approved. Example: In total, you have submitted 10 issues, 4 of them are approved, 6 of them are closed for reasons such as duplicates and out of scope. In this case your approval rate would be 40% which is very low as a good tester aims to not submit duplicates and follows scope requirements.
  • Creating Value - A good tester is someone who understands the stakeholder, finds the issues that are really relevant describing the root cause not just the symptoms. Issue quality and severity are more important that reporting many low-value bugs.
  • Team Work - Testing is a team work and we encourage all testers to support each other, answer each others' questions, give good advice and share helpful tips and tricks.

Please note that above all you should truly focus on finding valuable bugs and reporting them according to the standards. Reporting well thought-out issues and reading them through before finalizing the reports enhances your likelihood of getting more projects invites.

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